WAAHI TAPU SIGN ERECTED


AT OIOROA

Oioroa can be seen across the water, just in front of Mount Karioi
Oioroa can be seen across the water, just in front of Mount Karioi


Oioroa is the name for the sand dunes, which can be seen across Aotea Harbour, just in front of Mount Karioi.
Historically Oioroa was a burial site for the ancestors of Ngati te Wehi, but because of wind erosion many remains have been uncovered. As a result remains have been disturbed or removed by people without prior knowledge of both the people of Ngati te Wehi and the Department of Conservation.
In response to concerns about the desecration of this very special place the Department of Conservation has recently worked with Ngati te Wehi in erecting signs to help protect this Waahi Tapu.
Both logos of Ngati te Wehi and the Department of Conservation are displayed as a sign of partnership in this area of concern. The Ngati te Wehi logo is the same symbol as shown in the background of this webpage with "Ngati te Wehi" written above it and "Aotea Moana" written below.
The sign was erected by Department of Conservation staff in the presence of Ngati te Wehi representatives. Kaumatua , John Apiti, dedicated the sign.
Waahi Tapu Sign for Oioroa
Waahi Tapu Sign for Oioroa


The Waahi Tapu sign erected by Ngati te Wehi and the Department of Conservation.



=BONE & ARTEFACT=

RECOVERY



  • Any human bones or artefacts found within, or surrounding, the Aotea areas should be left undisturbed where they are and the Kaitiaki or a Kaumatuacontacted.
  • Kaitiaki will inform the closest marae to where the bones or artefacts have been found, so they can be gathered and buried appropriately.
  • The police will be notified and information will be passed to them upon request.
  • Any bones or artefacts which have been taken for research purposes should inform maraes from the area. Any bones or artefacts taken without permission should be returned.
  • Areas known to have urupa (cemetries) on them should have signs erected advising of the sensitive nature of the area and a contact number for people to ring if they do find bones or artefacts.
  • Anyone caught removing bones or artefacts from these locations without permission from the kaitiaki, a kaumatua or the nearest marae will be severely reprimanded and will not be permitted to enter any of these areas.
  • Anyone representing a tertiary institute or government agency must first contact the kaitiaki, a kaumatua or nearest marae to receive a permit allowing them to enter the areas to gather data or research related to bones or artefacts.
  • Photographing of any of bones or artefacts is prohibited without prior approval from a kaumatua.
  • Any persons entering areas known to have urupa must be accompanied by a representative from the nearest marae, the kaitiaki, or a kaumatua. If whanau from the area wish to visit these areas, and have knowledge of the protocol associated with bones and artefacts, they may freely visit the urupas.
    Kaumatua gives pre-european skull a home - newspaper article
    Kaumatua gives pre-european skull a home - newspaper article


    HONITI APITI with a pre-European skill he has buried in the family cemetery at Aotea Harbour, near Kawhia on the west coast.